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Patellofemoral Chondropathy Areas in Folk Dancers: An MRI Study

Neslihan Aksu, Vefa Atansay, Taner Aksu, Isik Karalok
From: Medical Problems of Performing Artists: Volume 36 Number 1: Page 34 (March 2021)

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Abstract: BACKGROUND: Patellofemoral chondropathy (PFC) is one of the most important causes of patellofemoral pain syndrome. PFC may occur as a result of anatomic reasons such as patellar malalignment and/or increased patellofemoral joint stresses. Most research on this subject has involved sports injuries and anatomic variations. The literature is scarce on PFC related to the dance. METHODS: Fourteen dancers (14 knees, all male) were found to have PFC based on MRI evaluations and clinical examinations between January 2010 and December 2019 (3 dancers were excluded due to prior surgeries of the knee). Age, sex, side of injury, range of motion, Q angle, types of dances, body mass index, and patellar specifics (alta, baja, Wiberg) were recorded for 11 dancers included in the study. We observed PFC at the femoral contact areas (FCA) and patellar contact areas (PCA) of Goodfellow description. RESULTS: Chondral lesions were observed at Gooodfellow areas FCA-3 in 2 dancers, FCA-4 in 5 dancers, PCA-2 in 10 dancers, PCA-3 in 10 dancers, and PCA-4 in 9 dancers. CONCLUSION: Dance styles that include frequent deep flexions and strolling on a flexed knee joint may be risk factors for chondral lesions in the contact area of the femur in male dancers.
https://doi.org/10.21091/mppa.2021.1005

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