Science & Medicine
Home | Current Issue | Archives | Subscriptions | Contact Us

Log In | Search | Author Index | Advertising

Atrial fibrilation: from focal firing to spiral waves

Francisco G. Cosio
From: Science & Medicine: Volume 9 Number 2: Page 72 (April 2003)

View Full TextAdd To BasketPurchase Images

Abstract: Most clinical tachyarrhythmias are believed to have their origin in reentry circuits, which are generally conceived as areas of continuous myocardial activation rotating around a fixed or functional central obstacle. In the last 10 to 15 years, the cellular and tissue factors involved in reentrant activation have become better understood, yielding effective treatments for many atrial tachyarrhythmias including atrial flutter. Yet, the picture has grown more complex for atrial fibrillation, as responses to antiarrhythmic drugs remain unpredictable and defy explanation by current models. A possible mechanism for atrial fibrillation is by rotors, a spiral wave rotating without a central obstacle but on the basis of excitability gradients that make activation advance slower at the center than at the periphery of the rotor.

Back to Table of Contents



Science & Medicine, Inc.
P.O. Box 313, Narberth, PA 19072
(610) 660-8097       (800) 888-0028
fax (610) 660-0348
e-mail editor@sciandmed.com
See our other journal: Medical Problems of Performing Artists.
Home | Current Issue | Archives | Subscriptions | Contact Us

Log In | Search | Author Index | Advertising

Copyright © 2002-2019, Science & Medicine, Inc.

Powered by Pliner Solutions, Inc.
Web Development by Pliner Solutions, Inc.