Science & Medicine
Home | Current Issue | Archives | Subscriptions | Contact Us

Log In | Search | Author Index | Advertising

Neural stem cells for brain repair

Tanja Zigova, Paul R. Sanberg
From: Science & Medicine: Volume 6 Number 5: Page 18 (October 1999)

View Full TextAdd To BasketPurchase Images

Abstract: Scarcer and harder to identify than those in the blood, stem cells exist in the brain throughout life. By definition, these are cells capable of self-renewal and of giving rise to all three major neural cell lineages: neurons, oligodendrocytes, and astrocytes. Yet in adult life they seem to generate neurons only to re-populate specific brain regions, in particular the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus and the olfactory bulb. Whether thay might be harvested, expanded in culture, and transplanted in large numbers to assist in repair of central nervous system tissue damaged by injury or disease is a question being addressed by many laboratories.

Back to Table of Contents



Science & Medicine, Inc.
P.O. Box 313, Narberth, PA 19072
(610) 660-8097
e-mail editor@sciandmed.com
See our other journal: Medical Problems of Performing Artists.
Home | Current Issue | Archives | Subscriptions | Contact Us

Log In | Search | Author Index | Advertising

Copyright © 2002-2020, Science & Medicine, Inc.

Powered by Pliner Solutions, Inc.
Web Development by Pliner Solutions, Inc.