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Advances in stroke treatment

George J. Hademenos
From: Science & Medicine: Volume 6 Number 3: Page 8 (June 1999)

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Abstract: Stroke is a vascular disease with neurologic consequences. The extent and severity of neuron loss and resulting deficits depend on the location and duration of the vascular obstruction. Until this decade, patients presenting with stroke symptoms were treated with anticoagulants, typically heparin. These prevented thrombi from getting bigger and interfered with the formation of new ones, but the stroke was left to run its course in the hope that regabilitation would allow some lost function to be regained. The presence of thrombi in the majority of stroke patients made thrombolytic therapy a natural consideration that has now become a major thrapeutic option for patients who come to medical attention within three hours of the onset of stroke symptoms.

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