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Mouse models of human obesity

David S. Weigle, Joseph L. Kuijpers
From: Science & Medicine: Volume 4 Number 3: Page 38 (June 1997)

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Abstract: Human body composition is affected by life style as well as by genetic factors, so human obesity genes are essentially impossible to identify directly. Descriptions of genetic defects responsible for Mendelian obesity syndromes in mice, and the functional consequences of these mutations, provide clues to the influence of genes on body composition. The central nervous system monitors body composition and adjusts energy intake and expenditure to stabilize total adipose tissue mass. Genetic variations in the signaling molecules involved account for the heritable component of body fat content.

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