Performing Arts Medicine, 3rd ed.Medical Problems of Performing Artists

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Ophthalmology and the Performing Artist

Michael F. Marmor
From: Performing Arts Medicine, 3rd ed.: Chapter 4 © 2010; page: 77

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Abstract: Although vision is critical for most performers, and especially musicians, performing poses few direct risks to eyesight. The greatest problems for day-to-day performance relate to presbyopia (near- and far-sightedness) in the older musician and difficulties with glare and lighting for all performers. This chapter reviews some aspects of visual physiology and ocular disease that are of particular relevance to the performer. Topics discussed in greater depth included presbyopia (near- and far-sightedness) and vision correction (using bifocals, contact lenses), refractive surgery (LASIK and PRK), glare, darkness and adaptation, cataracts, and occupational hazards (retinal detachment, intraocular pressure, retinal hemorrhage) as these relate to the performing artist.

Last Updated: 5 / 2010

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